The Books I Read in 2022

At the end of each year, I list the books that I have read during that year. Earlier years were 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013 and 2012. Below, you will find the list of books that I’ve read in 2022. Every year I also include an overview of my other media consumption habits (magazines, RSS feeds, podcasts, etc.).

This year, I managed to read 55 books for a total of 13,085 pages. This is about one and a half times as many books and nearly 70% more pages than last year.

A little over 30% of the books that I’ve read were written by women. About a third of the books that I’ve read had authors that were born in the US or the UK, a third were from Dutch or Belgian writers, and a third came from the rest of the world. This is the same as last year.

I’ve ordered the list of books into categories that make sense to me (and that are in many ways overlapping and arbitrary). These are the books that I’ve read and what I thought of some of them:

My reading challenge

This year, I started a new thing: my personal yearly reading challenge. Basically, I’ve tasked myself with reading a bunch of prize-winning books, mostly fiction. I was supposed to read these 18 books, and managed to read 12 of them (I had already read one of the 18 in 2021). The challenge worked, as these books have given me a tremendous amount of reading pleasure. Galgut’s Booker Prize winning book was the best thing I’ve read in a long while. Sheldrake wrote a fascinating book about fungi. Koolwijk shows that the Dutch have a great tradition of writing for children. Grunberg blew my mind, and I could see why Gurnah has won the Nobel Prize for literature.

  • Merlin Sheldrake — Entangled Life (link)
  • Damon Galgut — The Promise (link)
  • Pieter Koolwijk — Gozert (link)
  • Arnon Grunberg — Tirza (link)
  • Abdulrazak Gurnah — Admiring Silence (link)
  • Caro van Thuyne — Lijn van wee en wens (link)
  • Richard Powers — Bewilderment (link)
  • Nadifa Mohamed — The Fortune Men (link)
  • David Diop — At Night All Blood is Black (link)
  • Jeroen Brouwers — Cliënt E. Busken (link)
  • Anuk Arudpragasam — A Passage North (link)
  • Patricia Lockwood — No One Is Talking About This (link)

B00k C7ub 4 N3rd$

The book club read six books in the tenth year of its existence. MacAskill’s book led to the most discussion and the best conversation, but I thought it was disgusting. Luyendijk was an easy read that led to a good chat too. Higgins was interesting enough, Tarnoff has some sharp analysis about what is wrong with the internet, and Klein was too focused on the US (which I’ve lost interest in for the most part). Bridle wrote a poetic book that is worth your time.

  • Joris Luyendijk — De zeven vinkjes (link)
  • Eliot Higgins — We Are Bellingcat An Intelligence Agency for the People (link)
  • Ben Tarnoff — Internet for the People: The Fight for Our Digital Future (link)
  • James Bridle — Ways of Being (link)
  • Ezra Klein — Why We’re Polarized (link)
  • William MacAskill — What We Owe the Future (link)

Digital rights and technology

My friend Ot wrote a PhD thesis that is one of the best written that I’ve encountered thus far. I enjoyed Stikker’s book mainly for its alternative history of the internet (in the Netherlands). Rasch wrote an interesting long essay about autonomy in our technological predicament. I’ve added Eggers to this category, because as fiction is was terrible, but it does have some redeeming features as tech criticism.

  • Ot van Daalen — Making and Breaking with Science and Conscience (link)
  • Marleen Stikker — Het internet is stuk, maar we kunnen het repareren (link)
  • Miriam Rasch — Autonomie, een zelfhulpgids (link)
  • Dave Eggers — The Every (link)

Lebanon

Traveling for two weeks through Lebanon made me want to understand the country better. Fisk wrote an incredible journalistic masterpiece about the civil war. Hage’s fiction about the same topic was haunting, and so was Folman’s graphic novel.

  • Robert Fisk — Pity the Nation (link)
  • Rawi Hage — De Niro’s Game (link)
  • Ari Folman — Waltz with Bashir (link)

Fiction

I look forward to reading the third part of Sattouf’s coming of age story. Powers has fundamentally changed the way I look at trees. Ait Hamou and Geißler were not really worth the effort. D.B.C. Pierre’s book was a tough read, but he is clearly onto something about our social media infused world.

  • Riad Sattouf — The Arab of the Future 2 (link)
  • Richard Powers — The Overstory (link)
  • Simone Atangana Bekono — Confrontaties (link)
  • Ish Ait Hamou — Het moois dat we delen (link)
  • Heike Geißler — Seizoenarbeid (link)
  • Pierre, D. B. C. — Meanwhile in Dopamine City (link)

Children’s books

Both books by Van Leeuwen were fabulous (as ever). Samson’s book was a very funny look at primary school life. Hoogweg’s book was a visual fest, and so was El Hariri’s. Dr. Seuss is a master with words, but the racism is bit hard to take.

  • Joke van Leeuwen — Ik heet Reinier en ons huis is afgebrand (link)
  • Joke van Leeuwen — Nu is later vroeger (link)
  • Gideon Samson — Zeb. (link)
  • Pauline Hoogweg — De wereld maakt een koprol met Baz en Konijn (link)
  • Rafik El Hariri — Indigo (link)
  • Dr. Seuss — The Complete Cat in the Hat (link)

Sports and games

It was fun to read Hattersley’s older book about backgammon (from before a computer could check whether a strategy was the correct one), and I enjoyed Woods’ mix of practical golf advice and personal anecdotes.

  • Lelia Hattersley — Backgammon to Win (link)
  • Tiger Woods — How I Play Golf (link)

Non-fiction

Both Laing and Hartman are incredible writers and I very much enjoyed their books. Van der Kolk has given me a completely new perspective on trauma, and Ai Weiwei has done the same but then about China in the 20th century. The best designed book that I read this year was the one by Cheshire and Uberti: gorgeous maps. Klinenberg taught me the essential concept of social infrastructure. Rovers attempt at democratic renewal was well written and thought provoking.

  • Olivia Laing — The Lonely City : Adventures in the Art of Being Alone (link)
  • Saidiya Hartman — Lose Your Mother (link)
  • Bessel van der Kolk — The Body Keeps the Score (link)
  • Ai Weiwei — 1000 Years of Joys and Sorrows (link)
  • James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti — Atlas of the Invisible (link)
  • Audre Lorde — The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House (link)
  • Zineb El Rhazoui — Vernietig het islamitisch fascisme (link)
  • Alberto Cairo — How Charts Lie (link)
  • Oliver Burkeman — Four Thousand Weeks (link)
  • Eva Rovers — Nu is het aan ons (link)
  • Stephen Wildish — How to Adult (link)
  • Eric Klinenberg — Palaces for the People (link)
  • Jelle Brandt Corstius — Universele reisgids voor moeilijke landen (link)
  • Dipsaus — De goede immigrant (link)
  • Gillian Snoxall — Better Eyesight for Busy People (link)
  • Trine Falbe and Kim Andersen, Martin Michael Frederiksen — The Ethical Design Handbook (link)

My consumption of other media

I am a subscriber to the following media: Parool, Economist, New York Review of Books, De Correspondent, Follow the Money, De Groene Amsterdammer, Vrij Nederland, Logic, and OneWorld. I methodically page through them (refusing to look at any recommendation algorithm, like ‘most read’) and tag what I want to read. I then try to get to that, but usually have to let some articles drop by the wayside. I use my digital Economist subscription only to get a daily update via the Espresso app, I don’t go through the whole magazine as that is too time consuming. I should really read more of their things, maybe their audio queuing system in the app can help with that.

Since this year, I’ve become a member of the Algemene Onderwijs Bond (a union for educators), the Woonbond (a union for people who rent a house), de Bond van Volkstuinders (a union for people with or wanting to have an allotment), and of Nivon. All of them have magazines to browse through, which I do.

I strongly prefer to keep up to date through RSS instead of through email newsletters. Substack can be read via RSS, but I can’t fully escape email and read the newsletters I get from Priya Parker and for the local neighbourhood I live in. Every morning I receive the ANP press service newsletter aimed at journalists, giving me an update about what has happened and what will happen during the day. My favourite curators still are Cory Doctorow (although I nowadays skim rather than read him) and Stephen Downes. Both provide me daily with interesting links (thankfully via RSS).

Authors I follow via RSS include Kashmir Hill, Zeynep Tufekci, Bert Hubert, Evgeny Morozov, Jaap-Henk Hoepman, Karin Spaink, Ben Thompson, Linda Duits, Maciej Cegłowski (he hasn’t posted in a while), Ian Bogost, Harold Jarche, Rineke van Daalen, Aral Balkan, Cennydd Bowles, James Bridle, Ernst-Jan Pfauth, Axel Arnbak, Matthew Green, Yasmin Nair, and Bruce Schneier. Organizations and blogs I follow include Colossal, The Hmm, Bits of Freedom, EDRi, Digital Freedom Fund, Controle Alt Delete, Bij Nader Inzien, XKCD, EFF, Algemene Onderwijs Bond, Lilith, The Black Archives, Stop Blackface, and Stichting Nederland Wordt Beter. I keep up to date with technology news through Guardian Tech, MIT Technology Review, Rest of World, The Markup, and Tweakers. The only two Twitter accounts that I check regularly are the ones from Alexander Klöpping and Nadia Ezzeroili.

Using Pocket Cast, I still listen to all new episodes of Napleiten, De Rudi en Freddie Show, Radio Rechtsstaat (although they seem to be on a break) and (forever) This American Life. New on the must listen list are the Bits of Freedom podcast, Stuurloos, Vos en Lommer, Voordat de bom valt, Against the Rules, and most of Ezra Klein’s episodes. I am slowly catching up to the full backlog of the Vogelspotcast. Podimo has entered the market and I don’t want to use their app, so I lost touch with Een Podcast over Media and with Dipsaus.

When an episode looks appealing I will listen to Lex Bohlmeier’s interviews for De Correspondent, Cyberhelden, Cautionary Tales, Docs, Freakonomics, Philosophy Books, Philosophical Disquisitions, The Nextcloud podcast, Philosophy 24/7, Philosophy Bites, Planet Money, and The Tim Ferris Show (barely ever). I seem to have given up on 99% Invisible, RadioLab and Esther Perel. I am also way behind in Ear Hustle. I intend to listen to most of Conversations with Tyler episodes in the coming year.

There were a few one-off podcasting series that I listened to this year. Mother Country Radicals (great!), The Missing Crypto Queen, Rampvlucht, Dit kan geen toeval zijn, and the two podcasts about Rian van Rijbroek: Achter gesloten deuren and In de ban van Rian. Still queued up are Can I tell you a secret?, Wild boys, Het geheim van Rijswijk, and De zaak Ramadan.

What will I be reading in 2023?

I will try to fully complete my personal reading challenge for 2023. That will be these nineteen books. Next to that, I want to read a few books that are on the topic of (the morality) of work: The Refusal of Work, Werk is geen oplossing, and Automation and Utopia.

My personal yearly reading challenge

Recommendations are great, but only if they are done by a human being or if they are not algorithmically personalized. One of the best recommendation engines for what books to read are (literary) awards. I have used these awards to create my own personal recommendation algorithm.

Every year I try to read the following books:

  • All Booker Prize shortlisted books of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Booker Prize of a random previous year (only books that I haven’t read yet).
  • The winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction of the previous year.
  • The winner of the International Booker Prize of the previous year.
  • A book of choice by the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Prix Goncourt of two years ago (as I will need to read a Dutch or English translation)
  • A book of choice by the winner of the P.C. Hooft-prijs of the current year.
  • The winner of the Pullitzer Prize for Fiction of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Royal Society Science Books Prize of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Libris Literatuur Prijs of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Socratesbeker of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Boekenbon Literatuurprijs of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Gouden Griffel of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Woutertje Pieterse Prijs of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Bronzen Uil of the previous year.

If there are no double winners/nominations, then this is a list of twenty books to read, most of it fiction.

This list is very biased towards current and new books (which the Lindy Effect tells us, isn’t necessarily a smart idea). I am still thinking of ways of making myself read more great books that are a bit older.

It is also biased towards books from the languages that I can read. In the future, I might introduce winners of esteemed prizes in other languages (and give it a bit of time, so that an English or Dutch translation can come out), like the Booker equivalent for the Spanish language (if that exists).

Open brief aan Chris Oomen (eigenaar van ANP) over auteursrechtentrol Visual Rights Group (het eerdere Permission Machine)

Geachte heer Oomen,

De afgelopen jaren heb ik u leren kennen als bestuursvoorzitter van DSW. Daar heeft u op praktische wijze laten zien wat het betekent om op een rechtvaardige wijze vorm te geven aan het Nederlandse zorgstelsel. Toen bekend werd dat u het ANP had gekocht was ik daar zeer verheugd over. U ziet het belang van het bestaan van een onafhankelijke Nederlandse persdienst, ziet een rol voor de ANP om nepnieuws te bestrijden, en u zit er duidelijk in voor de lange termijn.

De afgelopen periode heb ik een nogal onprettige ervaring gehad met het ANP en ik ben benieuwd naar uw mening daarover.

Samen met twee andere vrijwilligers run ik sinds kort het Racism and Technology Center, een onafhankelijke ANBI-stichting met het doel om een kenniscentrum te zijn over waar racisme en technologie elkaar tegenkomen. Een van onze activiteiten is het verzamelen van nieuws over dit onderwerp. Daarvan plaatsen we een korte samenvatting op onze site en verwijzen daarbij naar het origineel. Soms schrijven we een stukje over dit soort nieuwsberichten voor onze nieuwsbrief. Ook dan verwijzen we naar het origineel. We hebben een paar honderd lezers die ons heel goed volgen.

Dit ging het afgelopen jaar helemaal goed totdat we dit schikkingsvoorstel ontvingen. Dit voorstel is namens ANP door Permission Machine aan ons gestuurd. Permission Machine is gespecialiseerd in het (grotendeels) automatisch opsporen van vermeende auteursrechteninbreuken.

De toon van het voorstel verbaasde me nogal. Ik ben gewend dat het de overheid is die handhaaft. Deze private vorm van handhaving had ik nog niet eerder meegemaakt. Wij zouden de ANP allerlei rechten hebben ontnomen, ons gebruik wordt “illegaal” genoemd, we worden “gesommeerd” om van alles te doen en de brief eindigt met een dreigement: “Het ANP en Permission Machine streven ernaar deze kwestie met u ordentelijk af te wikkelen. Mocht dat niet lukken, dan moet u er rekening mee houden dat verdere kosten voor de opvolging van het dossier en juridische bijstand ook op u verhaald zullen worden, tegen de uurtarieven die de behandelende partijen hanteren.”

De Belgische rechter heeft recent glashelder opgeschreven dat de praktijken van Permission Machine niet zo fris zijn: “De activiteiten die eiseres ontwikkelt zijn hoofdzakelijk gericht op het onder druk genereren van inkomsten uit vastgestelde (vermeende) schendingen van auteursrechten en niet op het doen ophouden ervan […] Dergelijke praktijken vertonen alle kenmerken van een zogenaamde ‘auteursrechttrol’ […].”

Of dit juridisch gezien een auteursrechteninbreuk is valt te betwijfelen. Wij denken dat het een citaat is en daarmee een auteursrechtelijke uitzondering geniet. Ook betwijfelen we of de foto wel genoeg eigen en oorspronkelijk karakter heeft om auteursrecht op te kunnen laten gelden. Of dit volgens de rechter een inbreuk is gaan we echter nooit achter komen. Onze stichting ontbreekt het namelijk aan de financiële middelen om het risico van een rechtsgang te nemen (het schikkingsvoorstel is al voor meer dan de helft van de huidige de waarde van onze balans).

Wat we niet betwijfelen is dat de ANP op geen enkele manier schade door ons gebruik heeft geleden. Wij zouden de foto namelijk nooit hebben gekocht en de ANP heeft niets verloren door ons gebruik (het is geen exclusieve foto die haar waarde voor derden heeft verloren door ons gebruik). Ook ontbreekt de menselijke maat: er is op geen enkele manier rekening gehouden met onze specifieke situatie als kleine stichting die opkomt voor de goede zaak (de ironie dat het een foto is van een slachtoffer van de toeslagenaffaire die een protestbord vasthoudt waarop staat “Waarom zijn wij onterecht beschuldigd?” is ons niet ontgaan). Ik heb er echt een vies gevoel aan over gehouden en vind dat de stichting onrechtvaardig is behandeld.

Als de ANP niet wil dat wij de foto op onze site gebruiken om te verwijzen naar het origineel, dan had ze gewoon aan ons kunnen vragen om deze te verwijderen, en dan hadden we dat uiteraard meteen gedaan. Dat zou ik een fatsoenlijke manier van handelen vinden en is volgens mij hoe je met elkaar om zou willen gaan.

Mijn vraag aan u is dan ook of u deze manier van handelen vindt passen bij het ANP onder uw eigenaarschap (deze praktijk met Permission Machine is voor uw tijd begonnen, wellicht bent u er nog niet van op de hoogte)? En hoe vindt u het eigenlijk dat de ANP een derde partij in staat stelt om ­– zonder iets substantieels toe te voegen aan de maatschappij – als auteursrechtentrol geld te verdienen met het intellectueel eigendom van de ANP, ten koste van organisaties zoals onze stichting?

Ik ben oprecht benieuwd naar uw antwoorden en hoop van u te horen. Permission Machine heeft ook een kopie van deze brief ontvangen.

Hoogachtend,

Hans de Zwart

Tijdslijn van deze zaak

  • 24 januari 2022 ­– Ik ontvang dit schikkingsvoorstel namens ANP van auteursrechtentrol Permission Machine.
  • 2 februari 2022 – Ik stel een aantal vragen in een brief aan auteursrechtentrol Permission Machine.
  • 4 maart 2022 – Ik publiceer bovenstaande open brief.
  • 23 maart 2022 – Ik was te gast bij Joe van Burik bij BNR Digitaal om uit te leggen dat ANP moreel laakbaar gedrag vertoont door in zee te gaan met auteursrechtentrol Permission Machine. Edouard van Arem, manager foto bij ANP, was er ook bij. Luister hier:

Sindsdien is er niets meer gebeurd in deze zaak.

Paleizen voor het volk, plekken voor iedereen

De Schots-Amerikaanse Andrew Carnegie opereerde eind negentiende eeuw als een soort proto-Bill Gates: obsceen rijk worden als meedogenloze kapitalist, om dat geld vervolgens uit te geven aan maatschappelijke projecten die je belangrijk vindt. In het geval van Carnegie waren dat duizenden grote bibliotheken. Hij noemde ze paleizen voor het volk.

Nu, ruim honderd jaar later, staat het merendeel van die bibliotheken er nog steeds, en creëren ze een unieke vorm van publieke ruimte. De bibliotheek is de enige plek waar iedereen naar binnen mag zonder iets te hoeven kopen. Een oase in de consumptiemaatschappij.

Bibliotheken zijn geliefd. Lale Gül beschrijft in haar bestseller Ik ga leven hoe de bieb een wereld voor haar opende: “Een schat aan spannende verhalen, de Donald Duck, computers met internetverbinding, dvd’s, een chocomelkapparaat, en dat geheel en al gratis.” Voor rapper en schrijver Massih Hutak is de bibliotheek een vrijplaats waar hij leerde piano spelen, zijn eerste verhalen schreef en stiekem schuifelde met een meisje in één van de vergaderzalen: “School, straat, hiphop, literatuur, religie, kunst, liefde en Amsterdam kwamen voor mij allemaal samen in de bieb. Een plek waar je veilig kon verdwalen.”

Die universele liefde voor de bibliotheek gaat bizar genoeg gepaard met een universele politieke ambitie om de bibliotheek weg te bezuinigen. Recent nog werden in Amsterdam vier locaties bedreigd met sluiting door een vermindering van het budget met anderhalf miljoen. We lijken collectief niet te begrijpen waar bibliotheken voor nodig zijn en welke functie ze vervullen.

De Amerikaanse auteur Eric Klinenberg weet dat wel. In 1995 deed hij onderzoek naar een dodelijke hittegolf in Chicago. Tussen buurten die demografisch en economisch identiek aan elkaar waren bleken toch grote verschillen te zitten in de sterftecijfers naar aanleiding van het extreem warme weer. Hij ontdekte dat de buurten waar minder mensen waren overleden, de buurten waren met meer sociale infrastructuur. Sociale infrastructuur zijn de fysieke omstandigheden die ervoor zorgen dat mensen sterke en wederzijds ondersteunende relaties met elkaar opbouwen. Dit soort infrastructuur is een noodzakelijke voorwaarde voor het bouwen van sociaal kapitaal. En laten bibliotheken daar nou het best mogelijke en tegelijkertijd meest onderschatte voorbeeld van zijn. We zijn ons er blijkbaar onvoldoende van bewust hoe onze omgeving ons sociale gedrag beïnvloed.

Dat gebrek aan besef wordt extra pijnlijk in de digitale ruimte. Iedereen snapt inmiddels dat Instagram, YouTube en TikTok geen infrastructuur zijn voor het vergroten van sociaal kapitaal. Het zijn surveillance- en advertentiemachines, gerund door hedendaagse Carnegies. Nagenoeg zonder na te denken over de consequenties laten we winstbeluste Amerikaanse en Chinese techbedrijven bepalen hoe we ons tot elkaar moeten verhouden en hoe we ons in onze informatiebehoefte moeten voorzien. Zij hebben het alleenrecht om te besluiten over wie er mee mag doen en wat er te zien is. Ze radicaliseren in plaats van dat ze socialiseren.

Stel je voor dat we zouden besluiten om te investeren in een digitale sociale infrastructuur. En dat we ons daarbij laten inspireren door de bibliotheek. Dan zouden we digitale publieke plekken krijgen, waar iedereen welkom is en die actief zo toegankelijk mogelijk worden gemaakt. Je zou er volledig anoniem aan deel kunnen nemen, zonder dat er wat van je wordt verwacht. Je zou er informatie kunnen vinden die tegendraads is of in jouw directe omgeving wellicht zelfs taboe is (“a truly great library contains something in it to offend everyone” zei bibliothecaris Jo Godwin ooit). En er zouden allerlei gratis en inclusieve activiteiten worden georganiseerd om mensen met elkaar te verbinden. We zouden daar toegang kunnen hebben tot ons gedeelde erfgoed en zo onze gedeelde cultuur kunnen vormgeven. En het digitale gereedschap zou ons uiteraard helpen om elkaar in de fysieke wereld te ontmoeten. Misschien wel bij de bibliotheek.

Laten we dit soort digitale publieke plekken zo snel mogelijk gaan bouwen. En deze keer zonder filantropen als Carnegie, maar gewoon met publieke middelen.


Eric Klinenberg schreef het boek Palaces for the People. Zijn boek wordt behandeld in een aflevering van de podcast 99% Invisible. Massih Hutak publiceerde zijn ode aan de OBA in het Parool. Een recent voorbeeld van voorgenomen bezuinigingen op bibliotheken – met mogelijke sluitingen tot gevolg – vind je hier. De Brooklyn Public Library legt in deze podcast uit hoe bibliotheken strijden tegen censuur. De Waag heeft een eerste aanzet gedaan voor de public stack, richting open, democratische en duurzame digitale publieke ruimtes. Als de OBA ooit een nieuwe directeur zoekt, dan sta ik klaar.

Deze column verscheen eerder bij Pakhuis de Zwijger als onderdeel van hun Nieuw Amsterdam Manifest 2022-2030. Foto door Schwede66 met een CC-BY-SA licentie.

The Books I Read in 2021

Covers for all the books that I've read in 2021

At the end of each year, I list the books that I have read during that year. Earlier years were 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013 and 2012. Below, you will find the list of books that I’ve read in 2021. Every year I also include an overview of my other media consumption habits (magazines, RSS feeds and podcasts).

This year, I only managed to 38 books for a total of 7.660 pages. This is about half as much as last year.

Close to 30% of the books that I’ve read were written by women. About a third of the books that I’ve read had authors that were born in the US or the UK, a third were from Dutch writers, and a third came from the rest of the world.

I’ve ordered the list of books into categories that make sense to me (and that are in many ways overlapping and arbitrary). These are the books that I’ve read and what I thought of some of them:

Digital rights and technology

Bowles has written the book that I wish I had written myself. It is very short, but manages to frame the most important ethical issues around (the design of) technology in a brilliant way. McLuhan was extremely entertaining and insightful as per usual. The other three titles each taught me worthwhile lessons about how to develop technology in an ethical manner.

  • Cennydd Bowles — Future Ethics (link)
  • Marshall Mcluhan — Counterblast (link)
  • Sasha Costanza-Chock — Design Justice (link)
  • Michael Kearns and Aaron Roth — The Ethical Algorithm: The Science of Socially Aware Algorithm Design (link)
  • Eva PenzeyMoog — Design for Safety (link)

B00k C7ub 4 N3rd$

The book club read seven books this year. Stanley Robinson’s book led to the most discussion (and included some unforgettable harrowing scenes about climate change), and Xiawei’s was the most idiosyncratic, teaching us about how China is using technology to keep its countryside (culturally and economically) connected to the rest of the country. Tufekci’s book is worth spending your time on to understand how technology changes protest and activism, even though we are now a decade after the Arab spring. Wiener is a brilliant writer and Hoepman has written a book about the technology behind privacy that every tech policy maker should read.

  • Kim Stanley Robinson — The Ministry for the Future (link)
  • Xiaowei Wang — Blockchain Chicken Farm (link)
  • Zeynep Tufekci — Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest (link)
  • Anna Wiener — Uncanny Valley: A Memoir (link)
  • Jaap-Henk Hoepman — Privacy Is Hard and Seven Other Myths (link)
  • Kate Crawford — The Atlas of AI (link)
  • Mariana Mazzucato — Mission Economy (link)

Improving my game skills

I played a lot a games this year. I had read Lugo before, and doubt there is a better book about partner dominoes. Olsen’s book about backgammon really improved my game. It is great for beginners, but will also satisfy the most competitive of players. Dee’s book about one of my new favorite games (Hive) was a sweet and short introduction, but if you enjoy the game you should really go for Ingersoll’s Play Hive Like a Champion instead.

  • Miguel Lugo — How to Play Better Dominoes (link)
  • Marc Brockmann Olsen — Backgammon (link)
  • Steve Dee — The Book of Hive: Strategy, Tips and Tactics (link)

Fiction

The fiction with the most impact on my thinking about the world were the books by Balci and Gül. Both of them showed – each in their own way – the stifling conditions that exist for many people living in or around Muslim communities here in the Netherlands. They have fundamentally shifted my perspective. It was great to reread the mysterious Chimo’s Zei Lila after many years. Chimo’s follow-up book is less interesting unfortunately. Den Ouden wrote a funny Roman à clef about being a project manager at the institution for higher education where I work (think the worst of bureaucracy, combined with a satire of agile software development, and an attack on diversity thinking). The most overrated book in the Netherlands in 2021 must be Lakmaker’s, whereas Coelho’s is probably the most globally overrated book of all time.

  • Chimo — Zei Lila (link)
  • Erdal Balci — De gevangenisjaren (link)
  • Lale Gül — Ik ga leven (link)
  • Chimo — Ik ben bang (link)
  • René den Ouden — De projectleider (link)
  • Tobi Lakmaker — De geschiedenis van mijn seksualiteit (link)
  • Paulo Coelho — The Alchemist (link)

Children’s books

Joke van Leeuwen will always be my favorite children’s book author. It is my ambition to read all of her work, so I’ve added three of her books to my list and enjoyed them thoroughly. Dahl’s book was a perfect as I remembered. And Van Lieshout has written (and designed) a beautiful young adult book about (the meaning of) art.

  • Roald Dahl — De reuzenkrokodil (link)
  • Joke van Leeuwen — Ergens (link)
  • Joke van Leeuwen — Waarom lig jij in mijn bedje? (link)
  • Joke van Leeuwen — Tijgerlezen – Fien wil een flus (link)
  • Ted van Lieshout — Wat is kunst? (link)

Non-fiction

The most special book I’ve read this year is Angelo’s. It is a mind-blowing exposé of the ingenious material objects that prisoners make in the US prison system. De Bono gave me some more thinking tools, these ‘shoes’ are good, but not as useful as the ‘hats’. De Dijn wrote a discerning history of our political ideas of the concept of freedom (if you are interested in this topic, I think Pettit will give you more actionable insights). Levine and Heller should be required reading for anybody with attachment problems in (love) relationships. Tanizaki is a beautiful ode to darkness, and Jansen gave me a very real and personal history of the beginnings of our welfare state. I found Gunster’s book about ‘omdenken’ to be an insult to my intelligence.

  • Angelo — Prisoners’ Inventions (link)
  • Edward de Bono — Six Action Shoes (link)
  • Annelien De Dijn — Freedom: An Unruly History (link)
  • Asis Aynan — Eén erwt maakt nog geen snert (link)
  • Hafid Bouazza — De akker en de mantel (link)
  • Amir Levine and Rachel S.F. Heller — Attached (link)
  • Junichiro Tanizaki — In Praise of Shadows (link)
  • Suzanne Jansen — Het pauperparadijs (link)
  • Simon Pridmore — Scuba Confidential: An Insider’s Guide to Becoming a Better Diver (link)
  • Henno Eggenkamp — De verguisde stad (link)
  • Berthold Gunster — Ja-maar… Omdenken (link)

My consumption of other media

I decided early in the year that I wanted to financially support journalism. So next to my existing Wired, Economist (reading their daily Espresso update), and New York Review of Books subscriptions, I also subscribed to De Groene Amsterdammer, De Correspondent (now turned into a lifelong subscription due to my volunteering as a board member for the Correspondent Foundation), Follow the Money, Vrij Nederland, and OneWorld. This is one of the reasons why I read less books: too much reading of long form journalism. I switched from the NRC to Parool as my daily newspaper, mainly because I enjoy reading about what is happening in my city of Amsterdam.

I strongly prefer to keep up to date through RSS instead of through email newsletters. But I can’t escape email fully and read the newsletters I get from Rick Pastoor (about productivity), Dipsaus, Audrey Watters (who has stopped writing for the most part), and the local neighbourhood I live in. Every morning I get the newsletter aimed at journalists from the ANP press service, giving me an update about what has happened and what will happen during the day. My favourite curators still are Cory Doctorow and Stephen Downes. Both provide me daily with interesting links (thankfully via RSS).

Authors I follow via RSS include Kashmir Hill, Zeynep Tufekci, Bert Hubert (for his Covid updates), Evgeny Morozov, Jaap-Henk Hoepman, Karin Spaink, Ben Thompson, Linda Duits, Maciej Cegłowski, Ian Bogost, Matt Taibi (only his free posts), Harold Jarche, Rineke van Daalen, Wilfred Rubens, Aral Balkan, Cennydd Bowles, James Bridle, Ernst-Jan Pfauth, Axel Arnbak, Matthew Green, Yasmin Nair, and Bruce Schneier. Organizations and blogs I follow include Colossal, The Hmm, Bits of Freedom, EDRi, Digital Freedom Fund, Controle Alt Delete, Bij Nader Inzien, XKCD, EFF, The Markup, The Black Archives, Stop Blackface, and Stichting Nederland Wordt Beter. I keep up to date with technology news through Guardian Tech, MIT Technology Review, and Tweakers. For fun, I enjoy the Reddit on The Big Lebowski. The only two Twitter accounts that I check regularly are the ones from Alexander Klöpping and Nadia Ezzeroili. And finally, the most valuable new edition to my RSS diet is the news from Rest of World.

Using Pocket Cast, I still listen to all new episodes of This American Life, Een Podcast over Media, Radio Rechtsstaat, and Replay-All. New on the list of must-listens are Napleiten and the Rudi en Freddie Show (I enjoyed the shows without Rutger Bregman the most). I listen to the majority of episodes from 99% Invisible, Cautionary Tales, Cyberhelden, Lex Bohlmeier’s interviews for De Correspondent, and In Machines We Trust. When an episode looks appealing I will listen to Dipsaus, The Ezra Klein Show, Freakonomics, Philosophy Books, Philosophical Disquisitions, The Nextcloud podcast, Philosophy 24/7, Philosophy Bites, Planet Money, RadioLab, The Tim Ferris Show, and Where Should We Begin by Esther Perel. This means that This Week in Tech has dropped off the list after many years of loyal listening.

There were a few one-off podcasting series that I listened to this year. The first few episodes of Bits of Freedom’s Big Brother Awards podcast of course, De Dienst (about the Dutch secret service, it mostly made me very angry), The Noord Face, Stuff the British Stole, and Sudhir Breaks the Internet.

What will I be reading in 2022?

My reading plans for 2021 did not come to pass for the most part. I did manage to read a bit about data/AI/technology ethics, but I only enlarged my list of half-read books instead of reducing it, and didn’t read any Toni Morrison nor did I get to Piketty or Kelton. Those latter two are still high on my list. I also want to make sure to read another McLuhan book.

Other than that, I am hoping to read a bit more fiction this year. Hopefully my personal rule of only bringing fiction on my holidays should help with that goal.

Update (10 January 2022): I like recommendations, and especially if they are done by a human being or are if they are not algorithmically personalized towards me. One of the best recommendation engines are (literary) awards of course. I have therefore created my own personal recommendation algorithm using awards as a guide. So this coming year I will challenge myself to read the following:

  • All Booker Prize shortlisted books of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Booker Prize of a random previous year (only books that I haven’t read yet).
  • The winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction of the previous year.
  • The winner of the International Booker Prize of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Libris Literatuur Prijs of the previous year.
  • A book of choice by the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature of the previous year.
  • A book of choice by the winner of the P.C. Hooft-prijs of the current year.
  • The winner of the Pullitzer Prize for Fiction of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Royal Society Science Books Prize of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Socratesbeker of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Boekenbon Literatuurprijs of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Gouden Griffel of the previous year.
  • The winner of the Bronzen Uil of the previous year.

If there are no double winners/nominations, then this will be a list of eighteen books to read, most of which will be fiction. The list is very biased towards current and new books (which the Lindy Effect tells us, isn’t necessarily a smart idea). I am still thinking of ways to engineer reading more great books that are a bit older.