in Learning, Presentations

Self Organized Learning Environments: An Assignment

This post is an assignment for the participants of the “Sociale media voor Leren en Veranderen in Organisaties en Netwerken”-leergang by En Nu Online.
(Click here to get a Google Translated Dutch version of this post).

Last February Sugata Mitra was awarded the TED prize for 2013. The prize money will help him carry out his wish:

My wish is to help design the future of learning by supporting children all over the world to tap into their innate sense of wonder and work together. Help me build the School in the Cloud, a learning lab in India, where children can embark on intellectual adventures by engaging and connecting with information and mentoring online. I also invite you, wherever you are, to create your own miniature child-driven learning environments and share your discoveries.

Watch Mitra describe his plans here:

I can’t link to this video without also linking to some of the criticism of his work. Audrey Watters raises some questions about, among other things, the history of schooling as it is told in the video, about (neo-)colonialism and about the commercial interests. Donald Clark lists 7 reasons for doubting Mitra’s success story.

Self Organized Learning Environment (SOLE)

According to Mitra you can organize a Self Organized Learning Environment (SOLE) for children by putting multiple children in a group, adding some broadband Internet and some encouragement and then drop in what he calls “curiosity catalysts”: large, open, difficult and interesting questions for these groups of children to answer. Self-driven learning is also becoming a current topic in professional development. See this post by Jane Hart as one example. We will explore whether Mitra’s thinking can help us in the workplace.

Basic assignment

For this assignment please do the following:

  1. Please download the Mitra SOLE toolkit from the TED website
  2. Read the toolkit
  3. Answer the following three questions by posting a comment at the bottom of this blog post:
    • What might be the key differences between child-driven learning (self-organized, curious, engaged, social, collaborative, motivated by peer-interest, fueled by adult encouragement and admiration) and the way adults learn?
    • What are the skills of a self-learning professional? How can professionals be supported in their self-directed learning?
    • What curiosity catalysts can you think of that you could ask your direct colleagues (or customers)? Think of two good questions.
  4. Find a new web-resource about self-directed learning (or self-organized learning, do-it-yourself learning, new-fashioned learning etc.) and post it as a comment on this blog post. It is “new” when nobody has posted it here before (so be quick!). It would be interesting to know why you chose this resource in particular.

Bonus assignment

There is no better way to judge how something works then to try it out. Starting from page 9 of the Mitra SOLE toolkit there is a home assignment: create a SOLE for children in your own home.

It would be wonderful if some of you could try this out with a group of children. Of course you will then send your feedback to Mitra and his team, but a comment here on the blog and/or some thoughts during the seminar are well appreciated too.

14 Comments

  1. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to join your webinar on the 17th of April. But nevertheless I read your blog, watched the video and read the Mitra SOLE toolkit. After reading I wonder in what way Self-organized learning differences from experimental learning?

    1. I think that the main differences between child-driven learning and the way adults learn is the curiosity of children to learn new things. Most of the time, adults think ‘what’s in it for me’ and don’t learn out of curiosity, but by getting to a goal: ‘I need this, because I have to do that…’. Children are also more creative in asking questions. Getting older means (in general) also getting less creative. Adults seems to think that asking some questions is weird of stupid, so they don’t ask them anymore.

    2. As an adult we should be more curious and have intrinsic motivation. I think you need skills like exploring, analyzing and wondering (?) as a self-learning professional. You can support professionals in their self-directed learning by giving them time to explore, without tight deadlines and goals. So they feel free to experience new things, feel free to make mistakes and find out the answers on their questions in other (more creative) ways then they used to.

    3. My two curiosity catalysts I could ask my direct colleagues are:
    – Is it possible to measure the learning progress of students, without taking the regular exams like
    we used to do? And what about the validity of these new way(s) f measurement?
    – Our management gave each of us an iPad. How can we use this tool as a team to work more
    efficient then we used to do?

    4. I found this site about self-directed learing. It is a site which supports teaching self-directed learning (SDL) and becoming a self-directed person. It supports home-schooling, experiential education, open schooling and life-long learning. There are many tools on this site you can use to become self-directed and teach your students to learn in a self-directed way.

    I’m curious what the others think about self-directed learning and hope you will have an inspirational webinar next week

  2. Hi Hans,
    very interesting topics about SOLE, especially the translation to self-learning professionals. I give you mij favourite link about it: http://www.leerarchitectuur.nl/?cat=35 It is dutch, but also links to english articels.
    I choose it because of the variety of links and the topics of learning of professionals.
    I think for learning of adults we can learn a few things of Sugra Mitra: ownership of learning, the urgency of a question, internal mortivation, curiousity, from threat to have fun in learning (working of the brain), connecting with others. And the role of the environment: having relevant connections and networks, filtering the wright information, working with big questions instead of giving answers and encouraging.

    Looking forward to next wednesday!

  3. Hi Hans
    very interesting to be introduced to SOLE, especially where learning goes beyond the “normal paths” and challenges to think bigger.
    Regarding the questions:

    1. Children are more open minded, make their own linkages and search for their own solutions if you give them the space to do so and encourage children to continue. Adults learn more in a pre-defined way, for example many adults find it difficult to learn a language by hearing – first have to see the words and understand the grammar.

    2. skills of a self-learning professional: first of all you need to be curious and able to link to others in search and learning. One way is using social media, being active in it, linking to other people. Important also is to know what you want to learn but to go beyond your own question. I think that professionals can be supported through introducing social media in such a way that it stimulates curiosity and encourages linking. Ownership on learning is another important aspect.

    2. Two questions: the organisation I work for introduced social media like twitter, youtube films without properly introducing them to the workers. What can the organsiation do to create greater curiosity amongst the staff/workers?
    SOLE focusses on creating a learning clod for children. Would it be possible to do the same (or use the same principles) for illiterate women in for example India?

    I googled on self directed learning, found several sites. Know too little about it to suggest something.
    maybe of interest can also be http://pinterest.com/dermidia/toddler-diy-learning-activities/ . One of the reasons because it stimulates your creativity and curiosity.

    Look forward for the webinar on Wednesday!

    • sorry I meant just pinterest – not as such the toddler learning!!

  4. 1. What might be the key differences between child-driven learning (self-organized, curious, engaged, social, collaborative, motivated by peer-interest, fueled by adult encouragement and admiration) and the way adults learn?
    Adults are more focused on meaning and sense making they benefit and ‘suffer’ from their own existing categories and interests that enable them to make a selection of the information and learning experiences encountered. Encouragement and admiration for example in the form of Mitra’s granny cloud would not work in the same way for adults, sadly so. Similarly there is enough evidence that curiosity in adults is affected over time and becomes more focused and narrower, often to their detriment. Children are more open, accept and look for play and fun, too many adults assume the attitude that learning has to be serious and a cognitive exercise. An example, I once started a team learning trajectory named ‘LOL’ leren-over-leren, the responsible Board member castigated me and wanted a serious professional development plan. Humor and learning were not linkable. A further inhibiting factor is the emphasis adults often have on usefulness and academic value, in itself these conditional thoughts are not wrong, adults simply have been socialized to be more restrictive. Hence in modern management thinking there is a strong call for accepting, organising and ‘playing’ with diversity as a learning principle.

    2. What are the skills of a self-learning professional? How can professionals be supported in their self-directed learning?
    Curiosity and creativity are intrinsic motivators that are two essential skills to embark on the self learning.
    An additional skill is communicative, as sharing, networking, linking and debate are features of a professional who learns and engages with others. This includes being able to articulate questions, ideas and insights in such a way that others can explore them and respond with praise, further questions or critique.
    Self-awareness (the descriptive self) of your own self, professional development, position and interests are important to grapple with the way you learn, sensemaking, meaning and usefulness.

    3. What curiosity catalysts can you think of that you could ask your direct colleagues (or customers)? Think of two good questions.
    a. What question or questions does life-long learning need to answer?
    b. What will a public non-profit organisation look like in twenty years?
    c. How can we make social innovations generative?

    4. I am adding three web based resources:
    The first is an exploratory analysis of self organised learning from The International Encyclopedia of Education (second edition); http://www-distance.syr.edu/sdlhdbk.html

    The second web based resource is a self directed learning test written in accessible language
    http://selfdirectedlearning.com/becoming-self-directed/activity-2-how-self-directed-are-you.html

    As I am a fan and follower of Ken Robinson for his thinking, presentation style and articulation

    Russell Kerkhoven

  5. Hallo Hans,
    Met interesse heb ik me verdiept in SOLE. Wat een passie gaat er uit van de spreker!
    Mijn antwoorden ontvang je in het nederlands, aangezien mijn actieve engels niet erg goed is.
    – de verschillen bestaan wat mij betreft dat kinderen vrijwel altijd in de “leerstand” staan, met alles wat ze doen. Volwassenen leren met name als het doel duidelijk is en er een sterke motivatie tot leren is.
    – een zelflerende professional kan goed reflecteren en onderkennen waar eventuele lacunes zijn. Verder gaat de professional op zoek naar de informatie die hij nodig heeft en weet wie hij in zijn netwerk hiervoor kan benaderen.
    – Een vraag die mensen in onze organisatie laat werken zou kunnen zijn: 1. Hoe kunnen we slimmer en sneller juridische inhoud met elkaar delen? 2. Wat kan jij bijdragen aan de (verbetering van de) kwaliteit van onze dienstverlening?
    – een site die ik wil gaan volgen in het kader van zelfgestuurd leren is : http://www.hetlerenvandetoekomst.nl/. Hier zijn een aantal studenten bezig met een aantal vraagstukken die mijn praktijk als opleidingsmanager raken.
    Ben benieuwd naar het webinar van morgenavond.

  6. Dag Hans, belangrijk thema en leuk dat er voorwerk aan het webinar zit. ik hoop alleen dat je nog genoeg tijd hebt om te kijken (als je dat als voorbereiding van plan was) . Ik was er nog niet aan toegekomen. Je eigen leren organiseren is namelijk soms best lastig!

    Ik viel van mijn stoel van het lachten toen ik de handout las in combinatie met de TED talk. In de hand-out is het ‘gewoon’ een lesplan geworden ,Waarin het mogelijk is om met computers te werken, maar wat niet eens nodig is. En dan zeker dat rijtje dingen te doen als ‘ze’ afhaken het bijtje erbij neergooien, dat ging toch helemaal niet gebeuren? Althans dat was de indruk uit de Ted talk.

    Toch begrijp ik ook wel iets van zijn ambitie. Er zijn mensen in onze groep die er denk ik meer verstand van hebben dan ik, Maar verleden jaar was ik in India en sprak daar daar met verschillende mensen over het onderwijs, en als ik dat dan kort door de bocht formuleer, dan kwam dat op mij nogal ouderwets en schools over. Juf of meester voor de klas die vertelt hoe de wereld in elkaar zit en drillen. En dat zowel in het lager onderwijs als op de universiteiten leek het mij…. En als de school in de cloud via een omweg dan weer terug is in de klas zoals uit een van de stukken die je meegaf bleek, dan vertaal ik zijn wens nu; als het transformeren van het Indiase onderwijs van een vak en lesstof en docent gecentreerd model naar een meer participatievere manier van werken. Waar hij dan uit opleidingskundig opzicht de meest basale en simpele ontwerpstrategie voor kiest, een media model. “he ik heb een tool, computer, daar ga ik iets mee doen”

    Die grote vragen vind ik wel interessant, en kinderen hebben die ook. Vandaar dat er tegenwoordig ook op veel lagere scholen filosofie les is. Maar juist werken aan die grote vragen, vraagt heel veel van kinderen maar ook van volwassenen. Samenwerken is namelijk een snel en makkelijk woord, maar in de praktijk blijkt het lastig te zijn. En samen zoeken en onderzoeken vergt veel van de vaardigheden van mensen. Dat zie ik dagelijks, daar valt nog heel wat in te leren…. En dat leren zit niet in de cloud, net als dat misschien de informatie over DNA wel in de cloud zit, maar niet het leren. Het leren is een sociaal proces van betekenisgeving, en dat doe je met elkaar, in interactie, in dialoog. In de cloud zitten feiten en data en ook een hoop onzin.

    Als het gaat om zelforganiserend leren, of wat ik altijd informeel leren noem, dan is er in essentie volgens mij niet zoveel verschil tussen kinderen en volwassenen. Het kenmerk van informeel leren is mi dat je ‘iets’ op het spoor komt, ergens tegenaan loopt, of hoe je het maar noemt dat maakt dat je gegrepen wordt en op onderzoek uit gaat. En dus gaat leren. En zowel kinderen als volwassenen doen dat mi totdat ze vinden dat ze er genoeg van weten, het kunnen, of wat ze dan ook maar als doel gezet hadden, of totdat het ze verveelt, ontdekken dat ze het toch niet echt willen weten, nodig hebben of wat dan maar ook. Ze zijn beiden zelf initiatief nemer, en beoordelen ook zelf of ze al dan niet klaar zijn. Voor beiden is het ook een van de vormen naast andere vormen van leren. Het kind zit op school, formeel verplicht leren, op tennisles, daar heeft het zelf voor gekozen maar hij/zij moet er zijn om 15.00 uur, er is eerst een serie oefeningen x, dan y etc, De volwassene volgt een verplichte in-company van zijn werk en een zelf gekozen opleiding waarmee hij/zij een carrière stap wil maken, enzovoorts.

    Vaardigheden die van belang zijn bij zelforganiserend/informeel leren zijn zeer divers, en ook afhankelijk van de strategie die gekozen wordt en de uitgangsvraag of het beoogde doel als je het zo wilt formuleren. Als ik mijn typvaardigheden op de laptop wil verbeteren dan vraagt dat iets anders dan als ik beter om wil kunnen gaan met spanningen in groepen of de relatie tussen de ontwerpvaardigheden van organisatieprofessionals en de kwaliteit van hun interventies wil onderzoeken. Maar toch als ik wat generiek probeer te antwoorden dan gaat het om:
    Vooral om
    – je eigen leerproces kunnen aansturen; blijven weten waartoe en waarom je wat, hoe en met wie aan het doen bent, en schakelen tussen reflectie, conceptualisatie en actie
    en
    – jezelf de goede vragen kunnen stellen
    – sociale vaardigheden om in interactie te kunnen leren
    – onderzoeksvaardigheden om het kaf van het koren te scheiden, bronnen te kunnen beoordelen etc

    Die sociale component is erg belangrijk; de kwaliteit van je informele leren neemt toe als je gesteund wordt, dat hoeft niet inhoudelijk, dat kan gewoon steun zijn, belangstelling.

    Als ik de derde vraag interpreteer als; hoe kan ik het informele leren van mijn collega’s klanten op het spoor komen en daarmee dus ook indirect sociale steun verlenen dan denk ik aan iets als:
    – Wat is naast al je reguliere werk, of dwars erdoor heen de vraag of de puzzel die jou op dit moment bezig houdt? Kan je daar iets over vertellen, En dan vraag ik door op waartoe, waarom, wat, hoe en met wie.

    Ik zoek een bron. En wat de bonus vraag betreft, ik heb op dit moment geen kinderen meer thuis, maar er liepen – niet exact vormgegeven volgens het stappenplan – eindeloos veel ‘projecten’.

    groet marguerithe

  7. I was interested both in Mitra’s ideas and in the criticism on his credibility. What is new in education seems to be linked to the vitality that the internet and IT bring into our societies. The internet and IT may not stimulate social behaviour as we think it should be, but it may develop. I wonder whether these idea’s, worded in the video and toolkit, need further maturing to take flight.
    1. I see, but also don’t see differences. As adults we have the child in us, and professionals have that quite strongly. Hear the laughing and the jokes in the video, the common wish not to have to feel too responsible, Fortunately more and more people work as professionals or knowledge workers and are allowed to play out the child in them.. Are adults more easily subdued by their surroundings than children? Maybe.
    2. Self- learning can be supported by assistance in the technical and practical part of it, in such a way that it reflects the SOLE pedagogy. Communication about the philosophy may be stimulating. The difficult question whether learning should always be non-normative I can’t answer. The remark that the little Mitra slum boys mostly learned to play games, and that the holes in the walls are now empty, may point out that some kind of a learning setting may be helpful as well. Some of the skills of self learning professionals/ adults are then to have a constructive mindset, and to be magnanimous towards insights and learnings by both peers and antagonists.
    3.My questions are: How can we make learning to practice (become good practitioners) more affordable by using technology and social networks? How can we stimulate that e-learning and self learning contribute to change the often still very hierarchical relations on the shop floor? .

  8. I was interested both in Mitra’s ideas and in the criticism towards his credibility. What is new in education seems to be linked to the vitality that the internet and IT bring into our societies. The internet and IT may not stimulate social behaviour as we think it should be, but it may develop. I wonder whether these idea’s, worded in the video and toolkit, need further maturing to take flight.
    1. I see, but also don’t see differences. As adults we have the child in us, and professionals have that quite strongly. Hear the laughing and the jokes in the video, the common wish not to have to feel too responsible, Fortunately more and more people work as professionals or knowledge workers and are allowed to play out the child in them.. Are adults more easily subdued by their surroundings than children? Maybe.
    2. Self- learning can be supported by assistance in the technical and practical part of it, in such a way that it reflects the SOLE pedagogy. Communication about the philosophy may be stimulating. The difficult question whether learning should always be non-normative I can’t answer. The remark that the little Mitra slum boys mostly learned to play games, and that the holes in the walls are now empty, may point out that some kind of a learning setting may be helpful as well. Some of the skills of self learning professionals/ adults are then to have a constructive mindset, and to be magnanimous towards insights and learnings by both peers and antagonists.
    3.My questions are: How can we make learning to practice (become good practitioners) more affordable by using technology and social networks? How can we stimulate that e-learning and self learning contribute to change the often still very hierarchical relations on the shop floor? .

  9. En de link die ik geef is naar http://www.papierenspiegel.nl van Sarine Zijderveld. zij geeft cursussen reflectief schrijven waar je over je eigen vragen leert schrijven, Zeer leerzaam en leuk. je kunt haar ook op twitter volgen, dan krijg je steeds een vraag van haar, een oefening oid, en dat zet op onverwachte momenten aan tot reflectie en tot leren.
    marguerithe

  10. Ook ik vraag me af of er wel zoveel verschil is tussen het leren van kinderen en het leren van volwassenen. Sommigen zijn leergierig van zichzelf en hebben van nature een brede interesse, maar de grote groep moet op de een of andere manier gestimuleerd worden tot leren, dat kan zijn door iets wat nieuwsgierigheid opwekt maar ook een gevoelde urgentie. Ik geloof wel dat kinderen onbevangener leren, terwijl volwassenen alles willen koppelen aan een doel. De bron die ik wil aandragen over self-directed learning is http://www.coaching.nl/improve/. Via dit platform kunnen mensen samenwerken aan hun eigen ontwikkeling. Ik heb er wat voorbeelden van gezien en was onder de indruk van de mogelijkheden.
    Tot vanavond! Henriëtte

Comments are closed.

Webmentions

  • "Remember, you are competing with Youtube" | En Nu OnlineEn Nu Online 17-04-2013

    […] “Remember you are competing with Youtube!” Na veel technische hobbels begint ons webinar met Hans de Zwart met deze quote.. Hoe verandert leren in de tijd van sociale media waar expertise gewoon op Youtube te vinden is? Zie hier de blogpost ter voorbereiding. […]

  • Changing the Responsibility for Learning | Technology, Innovation, Education 17-04-2013

    […] copied one of Mitra’s Self Organized Learning Environment (SOLE) experiments and gave all the attendees a challenging assignment to be solved by themselves in […]